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Bedroom Armoire

The bedroom armoire on page 6 requires only a "handful" of hardware, and most of it should be available locally or from the mail order sources below.

CONCEALED HINGES. The concealed hinges are fairly common, but keep in mind that you may need to order the hinges and the mounting plates separately. (The same plate can be used with different hinges.)

The hinges we chose are made by Blum, see photo on page 35. They open 170° and are designed for inset doors. We ordered ours from Woodworker's Hardware (B071T6650 for the hinge and B175H719 for the mounting plate), see list.

In addition to the hinge and plate, you'll also need a 35mm drill bit. Because this is the standard size for concealed hinges, you should have no problem finding one, see the list below.

WOOD PULLS. For the pulls, we purchased 1 1/4"-dia. cherry pulls (No.K92UC) from Grand River Wood Products, see photo on page 35. You’ll also want to order 1 1/4"-long screws (No. S14) for mounting the pulls. But other sources also carry wood pulls (though the size and profile will be slightly different).

GLIDE TAPE. The only other hardware item (besides assembly screws and shelf pins) is nylon glide tape, see list. It's applied at the bottom and side of each drawer opening, and you'll need 32 lineal feet.

ANILINE DYE. You probably won’t find aniline dyes at a local home center, but you should be able to find them at a local woodworking store or through the sources below.

There are really three different types of aniline dye: those that dissolve in water, oil, and alcohol. Waterbased (or water-soluble) dyes are the easiest to work with and the most lightfast (fade resistant).

For the armoire, we used three different Moser dyes (refer to the article on page 17). These are only available through Woodworkers' Supply (see list), but other brands are available from other sources. And because you can mix different colors (and in di

Sources

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